Press Release

Quantitative Transmission Ultrasound Featured Throughout SPIE Medical Imaging Conference

February 19, 2019

Quantitative Transmission Ultrasound Featured Throughout SPIE Medical Imaging Conference

QT Ultrasound’s principal scientists and technologists deliver five presentations at key industry event

 

Novato, CA – February 18, 2019 – Members of the QT Ultrasound® team of scientists and researchers have authored and co-authored five presentations to be delivered at SPIE Medical Imaging 2019, February 16-21.

The event is the internationally recognized premier forum for reporting state-of-the-art research and development in medical imaging and focuses on the latest innovations found in underlying fundamental scientific principles, to technology developments, scientific evaluation, and clinical application. During the conference, taking place in San Diego, quantitative transmission ultrasound technology will be among the cutting-edge research and innovations presented to attendees. Among those presentations is Radiologic-pathologic validation of transmission ultrasound tomography using microscopy with UV surface excitation (MUSE), findings that are an outcome of QT Ultrasound’s collaboration with UC Davis. Correlation of ultrasound tomography to MRI and pathology for the detection of prostate cancer is a presentation of findings that are a result of the company’s collaboration with the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Mark Lenox, Ph.D, QT Ultrasound’s Chief Technology Officer, explains “this is an important opportunity for the company to present the only true 3D transmission ultrasound technology, and for the industry to understand the importance of this emerging trend.”

QT Ultrasound scientists, Bilal Malik, Ph.D and James Wiskin, Ph.D have also been invited to be part of the SPIE Program Committee for Ultrasound Imaging and Tomography, a substantial honor that places QT Ultrasound’s team members alongside esteemed scientists that are unquestionably considered the leaders in all aspects of ultrasound imaging.

Quantitative transmission ultrasound is an emerging trend and the only true 3D transmission ultrasound technology that uses biomarkers for early detection of breast masses – with no radiation and no compression. Transmission ultrasound together with reflection ultrasound provide highly complementary and synergistic information about breast tissue. With images that show clear information about breast tissue, QT Ultrasound’s goal is to identify what is benign and what is problematic.

Conference attendees are encouraged to participate in these valuable learning opportunities:

3D full inverse scattering ultrasound tomography of the human knee: 17 February 2019 • 4:10 – 4:30 PM

Correlation of ultrasound tomography to MRI and pathology for the detection of prostate cancer: 17 February 2019 • 3:50 – 4:10 PM

Accuracy of quantitative breast density (QBD) score based on 3D ultrasound tomography: 18 February 2019 • 5:30 – 7:00 PM

3D inverse scattering in wholebody ultrasound applications: 18 February 2019 • 2:40 – 3:00 PM

Radiologic-pathologic validation of transmission ultrasound tomography using microscopy with UV surface excitation (MUSE): 19 February 2019 • 9:00 – 9:20 AM

 

About QT Ultrasound

QT Ultrasound® is a privately held company engaged in the research, development, and commercialization of an innovative automated breast imaging system producing high-resolution transmission ultrasound images. The company has received FDA 510(K)clearance for its QTscan™, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarded over $15 million in funding to continue QT Ultrasound research.  The company’s clinical trials have been conducted at prestigious institutions in the US and Europe and include ongoing trials at the Marin Breast Health Trial Center in Novato, California. QTscans are now available commercially through the breast imaging centers of QTbreasthealth.

The QT Ultrasound Breast Scanner is indicated for use as an ultrasonic imaging system to provide reflection-mode and transmission-mode images of a patient’s breast. The device is not intended to be used as a replacement for screening mammography.